AKIN OMOTOSO – I DIDN’T GROW UP ACCEPTING THAT MY RACE MADE ME INFERIOR

AKIN OMOTOSO – I DIDN’T GROW UP ACCEPTING THAT MY RACE MADE ME INFERIOR

In the profile interview, actor and film director Akin Omotoso shares some personal experiences of his upbringing, and chats about moving from Nigeria to South Africa during Apartheid.

Omotoso says that he knew he was about to witness something when he moved to South Africa.

I remember coming home from boarding school in December 1991, and my late mom, rest her soul just said listen, your dad has a job at the University of the Western Cape and we’re all leaving.

— Akin Omotoso, actor and film director

My father’s generation was very active during Apartheid so it made sense for us to move to South Africa says Omotoso.

He adds that many other African countries, including Nigeria, were very active during Apartheid, even on a personal level.

When you’re a child, you go where your parents are going.

— Akin Omotoso, actor and film director

Omotoso says that as a kid, he would ask his parents who Nelson Mandela was because there was a picture of him hanging on the door.

In Primary School, there was a play that was aimed at educating us about the brutality of the Apartheid system adds Omotoso.

Moving made perfect sense for my dad but for us, it was going to be a culture shock. When you’ve spent your life being told about a place that hates you because of the colour of your skin, you’re not going to go there.

— Akin Omotoso, actor and film director

I didn’t grow up accepting I was inferior because I was black. I can never understand it and I will never understand it. That in itself is a very strange concept.

— Akin Omotoso, actor and film director

Bontle Ndlovu / 702

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Nigerians in South Africa
Nigerians in South Africa 3315 posts

We are about democracy, human rights, public opinion, political behavior, civil rights and policy aimed at improving the human condition, with a focus on African countries.

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