BUHARI’S HEALTH SHOULD BE SECRET LAI MOHAMMED SAID

BUHARI’S HEALTH SHOULD BE SECRET LAI MOHAMMED SAID

Nigeria’s president is under no obligation to disclose his medical condition even if the state is the one paying for his medical bills, the Minister of Information and Culture, Lai Mohammed said.

Muhammadu Buhari has spent lengthy periods in London since January, sparking speculation about his fitness to govern — and also questions about who was footing the bill. President Muhammadu Buhari The 74-year-old former army general has said only that he required blood transfusions and had never been as sick in his life.

Claims from political opponents that he had prostate cancer have been denied but civil society groups still want to know whether tax-payers’ money was used for the private treatment. Buhari’s information minister suggested the silence was not unusual, just hours after the president returned to Abuja from another round of check-ups in the British capital.

“It’s not strange at all for a sitting president to be ill and it’s not strange either for the state to take care of his medical bill,” Lai Mohammed told AFP in an interview, without elaborating. “I think there’s so much speculation as to what he’s been treated for. “I think we would rather respect his privacy.

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Oludare J. Olusan
Oludare J. Olusan 248 posts

Publisher, Entrepreneur, Author and founder of The African portal / Presenter at The African Portal Radio / TV

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