JOBURG MAYOR “MASHABA” TO INTENSIFY RAIDS ON HIJACKED BUILDINGS DESPITE CRITICISM

JOBURG MAYOR “MASHABA” TO INTENSIFY RAIDS ON HIJACKED BUILDINGS DESPITE CRITICISM

JOHANNESBURG – Joburg Mayor Herman Mashaba says the city will intensify raids at what it calls hijacked buildings despite rights groups saying the process won’t solve core problems, or address real issues of poverty.

Mashaba is leading efforts to reclaim dilapidated buildings in the city centre, many of which have been unlawfully occupied for more than 20 years.

The Socio-Economic Rights Institute of South Africa (Seri) has strongly criticised the city’s push to clean up the CBD and reclaim illegally occupied buildings, labelling its raids inhumane and unconstitutional.

But the mayor says the raids are a way of profiling those who stay in the buildings to provide them with affordable accommodation.

Mashaba says a total 53 undocumented people have been arrested from the raids.

On Thursday, the city, along with the JMPD, police and the Home Affairs Department, raided several buildings as part of an ongoing crime-fighting programme.

But Seri’s Stuart Wilson says they need to address the real problems if they want to succeed.

“The kind of affordable accommodation the city is talking about is not affordable for the people living in the inner city right now.r city right now.

“What they really talking about is moving poor people out and moving rich people in and that’s not fair, that’s not lawful and that’s not Constitutional.”

This dark, rank building on Commissioner Street is hardly a home.

There’s no electricity, no running water and no toilets.

Residents say at night, some people smoke nyaope and criminals hide in dark corners.

They know it’s illegal to stay without paying but as one woman explains, it’s safer than being on the street.

“Yes I know that but there’s nobody to help us. We’re just staying because we are not working.”

This 61-year-old grandmother has called this place home for 24 years.

Although it’s unsafe and unhygienic, she has no choice.

“It’s tough to stay in here. It’s horrible, sometimes I can’t sleep. You’ll see people stealing other people’s stuff and they run away.”

People dump their waste and dirty water at the back of the building, and some who live here, fear this is making all of them sick.

Story: Hitekani Magwedze
(Edited by Leeto M Khoza)

Facebook Comments

About author

Nigerians in South Africa
Nigerians in South Africa 1747 posts

We are about democracy, human rights, public opinion, political behavior, civil rights and policy aimed at improving the human condition, with a focus on African countries.

You might also like

Business 0 Comments

SOUTH AFRICAN RAND SLIPS, STOCKS DRAGGED LOWER BY BIDVEST

JOHANNESBURG – The rand weakened on Tuesday with emerging assets struggling for clear direction as risk demand eased ahead of a speech before Congress by US President Donald Trump. On

Politics 0 Comments

South Africans ‘unwelcoming’ to African visitors

South Africans are regarded as unfriendly and unwelcoming to Africans from the rest of the continent‚ Tourism Minister Tokozile Xasa says. This was the key reason why the compound annual

WHY MORE FOREIGNERS ARE BUYING UP PROPERTY IN SANDTON

While foreign buyers in Sandton were historically most noticeable in the luxury market, recent sales suggest that more SADC nationals and buyers originally from central and West Africa are now

0 Comments

No Comments Yet!

You can be first to comment this post!

Leave a Reply