Nigeria’s first ever corruption survey is as bad as most people imagined

Nigeria’s first ever corruption survey is as bad as most people imagined

Corruption is bad in Nigeria—but just how bad?
Thanks to the first ever large-scale household survey on corruption released last week by the country’s National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), Nigerians finally have a idea. For the most part, it’s not good.
Nearly a third of Nigerian adults who had contact with local public officials in the period under review reported cases where bribes were solicited or paid to a public official, the report found (pdf). On average, Nigerians pay six bribes per year, or one every two months.

NBS estimates the total amount of bribes paid to public officials amount to $4.6 billion in purchasing power parity terms—the equivalent of 39% of the country’s federal and state budgets for education last year.

NBS’ report also suggests that the corruption problem won’t go away soon, as Nigerians rarely report bribery solicitations and payments—only 3.7% of those surveyed reported to the authorities that they’d paid a bribe. The low rate is attributed to a lack of faith in the ability or willingness of the authorities to crack down on bribery. In many cases, these officials are caught in a vicious cycle of corruption.

NBS’s report finds that more than 15% of households with a family member in public administration had paid a bribe.
Nigeria’s National Judicial Council has protested the findings, calling the report “untrue, baseless, unfounded and a figment of the imagination” of the NBS. Nigeria’s police force also pushed back, claiming that things aren’t as bad as the report makes out.

This narrative has already been dismissed by Nigerians, who are sharing stories of less than pleasant (and legal) encounters with the police.

NBS’ report also suggests that the corruption problem won’t go away soon, as Nigerians rarely report bribery solicitations and payments—only 3.7% of those surveyed reported to the authorities that they’d paid a bribe. The low rate is attributed to a lack of faith in the ability or willingness of the authorities to crack down on bribery. In many cases, these officials are caught in a vicious cycle of corruption.

NBS’s report finds that more than 15% of households with a family member in public administration had paid a bribe.
Nigeria’s National Judicial Council has protested the findings, calling the report “untrue, baseless, unfounded and a figment of the imagination” of the NBS.

Nigeria’s police force also pushed back, claiming that things aren’t as bad as the report makes out. This narrative has already been dismissed by Nigerians, who are sharing stories of less than pleasant (and legal) encounters with the police.

Story: Yomi Kazeem

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Nigerians in South Africa
Nigerians in South Africa 4280 posts

We are about democracy, human rights, public opinion, political behavior, civil rights and policy aimed at improving the human condition, with a focus on African countries.

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